Planit IE | Copenhagen Housing Typologies and Gardens – Tokunaga Tours led by self-confessed landscape nerd, Joey.
The priority placed within high-quality housing and landscape design made it easy to understand how Denmark claims to be one of the happiest places in the world - a sense we drank in whilst enjoying the city.
Copenhagen, study trip, housing, gardens, Jotaro Tokunaga, 8 Building, Ørestad, Hilmar Baunsgaards Boulevard, Kartofelraekkerne, Potato Rows, Christina Goodband, Helen Buckle
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Team Tokunaga in Copenhagen

Housing Typologies and Gardens – Tokunaga Tours led by self-confessed landscape nerd, Joey.

‘8 House’ is a somewhat misleading term, as it consists of 476 housing units in Ørestad, South Copenhagen, therefore making it a very large house! Although each unit was identical in architectural design and aesthetics, the individuality of the homeowner was reflected through the personalisation of the small front gardens. Large windows with no blinds or curtains allowed us to appreciate the interiors; understanding the level of importance that the Danes devote towards their homes, no matter how big or small. The relationship between 8 Building and its landscape surroundings was evident. From the sloping green roofs strategically planted to reflect the lush greenness of the farmlands, to the architectural design form that allows every apartment an outward view of the extensive landscape. A contemporary palette of glass, stainless steel and Corten was repeated throughout. Rather than feeling intrusive, the blue sky and water ripples reflected against the glass and steel, merging the landscape into the material palette.

We later stumbled upon Hilmar Baunsgaards Boulevard, and were rather surprised to find a beach within the settlement, nestled behind a busy road. There were even steps down into the water, for a leisurely swim. We noticed how the car parking was underground, optimising the ground space purely for living and socialising.

Kartofelraekkerne, also known as ‘Potato Rows’ featured long rows of terraced streets. Here, we noticed how the boundary of outdoor living was extended to the streets. Picnic tables, kids’ scooters and bikes laid scattered in the streets. Despite being a stone’s throw from the busy shops and roads, it felt quiet and very safe. The priority placed within high-quality housing and landscape design made it easy to understand how Denmark claims to be one of the happiest places in the world – a sense we drank in whilst enjoying the city.

Written by Graduate Landscape Architect, Christina Goodband and Senior Urban Designer, Helen Buckle.

Find out more about the practice’s danish-style 20th year celebrations and what the teams got up to in Copenhagen
Team Marohn – Public Squares and Beautiful Streets
Team Swift – Connectivity and Cycling
Team Chairetaki – Education and Culture
Team Lord – Parks and Cemeteries
Team Santini – Masterplanning and Regeneration